Finding my Perfect Bra

This post was kindly sponsored by Lara Intimates.

Bras have been difficult for me – trying to find something that checks my ethical and sustainable criteria, plus looks good, and fits correctly has been a challenge, but then Lara Intimates came along.

I discovered Lara in their crowdfunding stage and loved their mesh styles and mission, but initially assumed they wouldn’t have my size. So I was thrilled when they reached out asking if I wanted to test their “Find My Bra Size” feature and found out they actually do make my size!

Lara Intimates Wren Bra

Here’s what I love about Lara

They use reclaimed and surplus materials

They source luxury lingerie fabrics from companies who have leftovers or maybe had an issue like the fabric was the wrong colour, these textiles are unused but would just go to the landfill if brands like Lara didn’t exist. Any fabrics they do get in weird colours they have dyed black to match. It’s not just their textiles that are eco-friendly, Lara also used reclaimed and surplus components and hardware when possible and sustainable options for things like their tags and packaging.

 

They cut and sew consciously

Two often overlooked sustainability issues with fashion is excess stock waste and cutting room waste. Lara makes all their garments to order so they don’t have unused stock and this also allows them to be strategic when cutting out the fabric – mixing and laying pattern pieces like a tetris puzzle to reduce fabric waste.

Lara Intimates Coral Bra

They have their own studio-factory

Lara’s founders Faith and Cindy wanted to manufacture locally but they they were shocked to find there was only one lingerie factory in Britain and they couldn’t afford to work with them. So what did they do? Set up their own factory in-house! Lara has an all female team and a focus on providing training and a high standard of living for their employees. They even have plans to launch an apprenticeship program to train and provide job opportunities for low-income and vulnerable women teaching them technical design and manufacturing skills.

 

They have great styles

The typical “eco” bras I’m used to are basically a simple bralettes with elastic and a piece of fabric, but Lara has changed the game with their unique, mesh-panel designs. Their styles not only look really good but the layered mesh also adds extra support where you need it.

Lara Intimates bras

They actually fit

Ordering online you never know how the garment is going to fit, so it’s extra daunting ordering something like a bra. Not only was I happy they actually carried my size, but I was also impressed how well both styles fit. I do prefer the Wren bra comfort-wise because I just don’t find a halter as comfortable across the neck, but both are snug and supportive and fit well in the cups without any issues.

Also if their size calculator didn’t work for you, you can return or exchange your bra for free! (Or if you’re in London book a fitting at their studio)

 

They want women to love their boobs

Lara also has a wonderful body-positive ethos. They shoot on models with different body types and also have women share their stores in The Boob Diaries. I wish I could say that I’m 100% confident in my body but the reality is I had to push myself to take photos and film in just a bra. It’s not only incredibly awkward since I’m not at all a model and don’t know what to do, but I couldn’t help but wonder what people will think and compare myself to all the gorgeous, skinny, tanned women on Instagram. Loving your body is a personal journey, but I also think brands who showcase more than one body type is an important part of helping change how we see ourselves.

Lara Intimates Wren Bra

 

Today is International Women’s Day so a perfect time to join me in practicing some self-love and acceptance. 💕

Also it’s a great day to remember that roughly 80% of garment workers are women, so an incredible way to support other women around the world is by supporting women-owned businesses and brands that pay fair wages, care about, and empower the women who work for them!

 

Learn more about Lara

💋

 

 

Wandering the streets of Lisbon

Green Lisbon

found in travel | 0

We recent went on a wonderful trip to Lisbon. This was our first time visiting Portugal and much of what we experienced was from suggestions – thanks to everyone who recommended places! As we visited in mid-February we only saw a fraction of the visitors that likely visit in high season and were lucky enough to still get sunny weather nearly every day. We spent most of our time wandering the neighbourhoods and cobblestone streets. Although we had sore legs from the many hours of walking each day, we really enjoyed our time there. Here’s a few of our favourite places to see, shop, and eat at if you’re visiting beautiful Lisbon:

 

What to Do

LXFactory

LXFactory sign Lisbon

LXFactory was recommended by many people, and with good reason! It’s a district with old brick buildings and warehouses filled with shops, cafés, restaurants, and artist’s studios. There are even a few sustainable/ethical stores (details below), and a restaurant with mostly vegan food (not our favourite, but nice for a lunch while exploring LXFactory). I recommend planning an afternoon here and meandering slowly from place to place, have some drinks and food, and check out the street art.

 

Alfama neighborhood

Alfama Lisbon

Alfama is full of traditional-style buildings with cobbled, narrow streets winding up, down, and through the hills. Speaking of hills, this neighbourhood has plenty of them – definitely come prepared with decent walking shoes when you visit. There was something interesting to experience at any time of day – the sleepy quiet of mornings, laundry draped outside of the windows’ clotheslines, the impressive wall art around nearly every corner, and Fado songs (typical Portuguese music from Alfama) drifting out of nearly every restaurant later in the evenings. Definitely give this neighbourhood a wander if you’re in Lisbon!

 

Miradouros

Lisbon viewpoint

As Lisbon is a hilly city, there’s no shortage of viewpoints or Miradouros throughout the hills. Try to visit a few in different neighbourhoods if the weather is clear, as they’ll give you a picturesque view of the city and ocean. We visited any that happened to be nearby or on the way we were heading, and they were all impressive in their own way.

view of Lisbon

 

Where to Shop

Organii

Organii eco shop Lisbon

Organii is one of the eco/ethical shops we visited at LXFactory and we were really impressed! It’s full of natural, organic, sustainable, and ethical products ranging from housewares to fashion to children’s toys and clothing. I even found the coat I’ve been looking for! It’s made by a conscious Portuguese company called Näz, their materials are all production surplus and deadstock, and they only use recycled buttons on their garments made from things like paper, cotton, and even coffee grounds. The coat is exactly what I had been searching for and I’m so glad I waited for the right piece. This shop is a must when visiting LXFactory. Organii also has a cosmetics-only shop just down the road from their larger location. They carry different natural brands as well as their own line of soaps and oils, I also picked up their winter body oil which has a lovely spicy/forest-y scent.

Organii natural beauty in Lisbon
Checking out their in-house oils

 

There are a few other Organii locations in Lisbon (some cosmetics only or baby products) but if you’re already visiting LXFactory, you’ll get everything they offer in one location. We also saw SkunkFunk (sustainable fashion), and Nae (Portuguese-based vegan shoes) while wandering through LXFactory so definitely check those out while you’re there as well!

 

Fair Bazaar
Shopping at Fair Bazaar Lisbon
Looking at Näz in my new Näz coat

Fair Bazaar is a small shop is situated in a gorgeous old building along with other interesting stores, collectively called Embaixada. They also sell Näz (and carry more of the line than Organii), as well as other clothing brands, shoes, accessories, jewellery, and some care products. Everything here is sustainable or ethical and they also sell some cork products, which is a very common material in Portugal. Although it’s important to note that while there’s a lot of cork it seems like most of the cork companies also include leather in their products, which was pretty disappointing to see – although Nae (at LXFactory) has some cork shoes that are completely vegan!

 

Sapato Verde

Natural and eco car products at Sapato Verde

Sapato Verde is a vegan shopper’s dream! They carry a variety of shoes as well as bags, clothing, accessories, home goods, toiletries, and even have a small vegan grocery store and café at the back. They have an interesting selection of eco-friendly products including a candle brand that uses old cooking oil for their candles and flip flops made of cork.

shoes at Sapato Verde Lisbon
Some of the casual shoes they offer

I was most impressed with their selection of footwear including Nae, Natural World, and Original Cork in styles from dress shoes to runners to casual shoes.

 

Garbags

Garbags upcycled bags

This one was an interesting surprise and classically eco-friendly. Garbags takes everyday waste such as coffee bags, tire inner tubes, shampoo containers, and other kinds of packaging waste to create unique pieces including wallets, carrier bags, pouches and notebook covers. They even have a deal where if you bring in some of your waste (something they can use) they’ll give you a discount on their products! They also offer interchangeable covers for their messenger bags, so you can change up your style without buying a totally new bag. Definitely a unique business model and it’s cool to see how they turn waste into functional products.

 

Where to Eat

The Food Temple

One of our favourite meals of the trip was at The Food Temple. You’ll find it down some narrow twisting sidewalks, just look for the blue light out front. We recommend making reservations here, as when we arrived (without reservations) there luckily happened to be space for 2 at a shared table, but many who came after us weren’t so fortunate. Their menu changes daily and they have shared tapas and dishes. On the day we went we had a spinach soup, veg chorizo and avocado salad, some kind of interesting potato dish, and a burger with the thinnest curly fries to share which was a pretty good amount for us. They had a variety of local craft beers and interesting desserts such as the lavender-infused raspberry cake they offered on our visit. The staff were super friendly and it was a lovely dinner, but unfortunately I don’t have photos. 🙁

 

Princesa do Castelo

Princesa Do Castelo vegan restaurant, Lisbon

Princesa do Castelo is a small vegan restaurant/cafe in Alfama that also has a changing daily menu (this seems to be common in Lisbon), we ate here a couple times and weren’t disappointed. They have a few long shared tables plus a couple tables for 2, but again space is limited so reserve a table or arrive before the lunch/dinner rush. The first time we went we each tried one of the 2 mains – a vegetable thupka with ginger lemon tofu, and a chickpea/pumpkin/spinach curry (pictured). We finished with Portuguese custard tarts; although these are common in Lisbon they offer a vegan version.

 

Sama Sama

Sama Sama crepes, Lisbon

We were walking around on the one rainy day we had and stopped here for a quick lunch. Sama Sama is a tiny crepe and juice bar with just a bar, so don’t expect a place to sit (though there were a couple of small stools near the door). They serve vegetarian and vegan crepes both savoury and sweet, and the two we had were fantastic! Since it was lunch we had savoury crepes but I wish we had time to also go back and try the sweet ones. This place is especially great if you want to grab a crepe and walk around the neighbourhood or by the ocean.

 

Overall Lisbon was a lovely city and perfect for travellers like us who like to wander through the streets and neighbourhoods. While it doesn’t have a ton of sustainable shopping, the stores it does have are definitely worth checking out, as well as the delicious restaurants.

 

Find everything:

 

Also check out everything I packed for our trip.

 

What Eco-Influencers Eat

found in eating | 12

What is a sustainable diet? I’ve teamed up with other members of Ethical Writers & Creatives to share what we eat in a typical day and why.

The video above ^ shows what I ate on a day of healthy, home-cooked meals.

Morning

My day started as it always does with a cup of tea. Tea is a must-have for me and I drink at least one cup a day.

For breakfast most days I’ll have oats or muesli with fruit. I usually use oat milk but our grocery store was unfortunately out of stock, so this week we had rice milk (I always make sure the milk has added calcium though). This muesli has dried fruits but I added a banana as well.

Later in the morning I’ll have a light snack, and we had some delicious clementines which make a perfect snack.

Afternoon

For lunch I’ll often have leftovers from the night before – I like to cook extras so we have enough for lunch the next day. If there aren’t leftovers, this simple sweet potato and crispy kale dish is something I really enjoy in the winter – it’s warm and comforting plus includes seasonal veggies! It’s also really easy to make and just involves roasting sweet potatoes and making kale chips close to when the potatoes are done. You cut the potatoes open, add hummus and top with the baked kale. The potato and hummus are super creamy and the kale chips adds a great texture.

Later in the afternoon I’ll usually have a snack. This might be some nuts, or hummus with veggies or chips (if I didn’t already have hummus for lunch). Sometimes I want something sweet and will have chocolate or if I’m out with friends we’ll usually go for coffee and cake in the afternoon. On this day I had some homemade “peanut butter bites”. These ones are just peanut butter, puffed amaranth, and maple syrup – you can find tons of different recipes for things like this on Pinterest and they can be a great snack, but I wish I had also added chocolate. 😉

Evening

For dinner I usually make a big curry, stew, stir-fry, pasta dish, or “Buddha bowl” like this day. I’ll try to use up what veggies we have around and for this bowl I wanted to use leftover kale (and actually should have made an extra sweet potato for it too). I also added cooked mushrooms to the rice, chopped tomato and red pepper, steamed broccoli, and chickpeas. For a sauce I made a quick sesame sauce based on Minimalist Baker’s tahini dressing.

Finally I’ll often end the day with another cup of tea, I love a peppermint or a herbal blend at night. 🍵

 

I enjoy cooking but often don’t want to spend too much time, so I try to make more simple, healthy dishes. Usually quick and simple for me means pasta and sauce, packaged foods, or going out, but I’m finding more and more delicious healthy dishes that are also easy to make!

 

vegetables
Photo by Peter Wendt on Unsplash

How is my diet sustainable?

I’ve been vegetarian for over 10 years now and follow a mainly plant-based diet which is a big part of sustainable and ethical eating for me. Food was actually where I began my journey (after learning about the cruelty behind factory farming) and made me think more about what I consumed, where it came from, and the greater impact it had.

We are very lucky to have good organic stores in my city (that aren’t crazy expensive) and I buy a lot of our groceries organic, especially produce that uses the most pesticides like the “dirty dozen”. Most people assume I buy organic for health reasons, but I’m actually more concerned about the affects of pesticides on biodiversity and especially how they harm bees, which are so important as pollinators in our food system.

When planning meals I try to incorporate seasonal produce and buy locally-grown when possible. Eating seasonally is not only more sustainable but also more affordable and I enjoy trying new recipes and ways to eat seasonal fruits and veggies.

Some things I’m currently working on are reducing plastic packaging by buying what I can in bulk and I’m also trying to buy fewer pre-made, packaged foods – this not only reduces plastic waste but they’re generally not very healthy, plus a lot of them contain palm oil which I like to avoid due to the deforestation issues caused by palm plantations.

Another important aspect of a sustainable diet to me is food waste and I try to only buy what I know will get used/eaten. Something that I’ve found incredibly helpful is having a small fridge which seems common in Europe but not what I’m used to in North America. With a small fridge you can see everything and remember to use it, plus you can’t over-buy because there isn’t space for it. We almost never have to throw any food out which I’m really happy about.

photo: Dennis Wilhelms www.denniswilhelms.com

With any diet changes and shifting to more conscious eating, I think it’s really important to take it in small steps and not worry about being “perfect”. Food is such a huge part of our daily lives and I’ve found focusing on one thing at a time and slowly building on that to be really helpful.

So that’s how I eat, but there are many different approaches to a sustainable diet. See what these other eco bloggers and content creators eat:

Alden from EcoCult

Kathryn from Going Zero Waste

Jen from Honestly Modern

Leah from StyleWise

Florine from The Wasted Blog

Cait from World Threads Traveler

Chloé from Conscious by Chloé

Holly from Leotie Lovely

Renee from Model4GreenLiving

Faye of Sustaining Life

 

What I Packed for our Trip to Portugal

found in travel | 1

My husband Ben and I just got back from a lovely trip to Lisbon and Sintra and here’s a video of what I brought.

We were there for 8 days plus a travel day where we arrived later in the evening. The weather was predicted to be pretty nice with temperatures around 12-15°C so I planned on packing lighter layers, most people there were wearing winter coats but I guess being from Canada 10°C+ weather really doesn’t seem very cold to us.

Everything I packed in the suitcase (in video order):

  • cardigan
  • trousers
  • leggings
  • navy tee
  • black tee
  • grey long-sleeve top
  • light grey knit top
  • tee dress
  • shirt dress
  • black dress (brought this for an evening out but didn’t end up wearing it)
  • tights and socks
  • underwear, bras, and a bodysuit
  • ankle boots
  • tie belt
  • bamboo necklace

I also packed:

  • plug adapter
  • camera battery charger
  • mini hair straightener
  • tea
  • travel mug
  • tote bag
  • sleeping shirt
  • and a purse

In my toiletries bag I packed:

  • toothbrush
  • hairbrush
  • cleanser (read more below)
  • menstrual cup
  • oil (read more below)
  • shampoo samples
  • tinted moisturizer

Also important to mention that in Ben’s bag was toothpaste, cream deodorant, and a travel-size Dr. Bronners soap for both of us to share.

For makeup I brought:

  • travel brushes – powder, angle & eyeshadow
  • lip glaze 
  • brown eyeshadow/brow powder (this is from my palette but I put it into an old eyeshadow container for travelling since I sometimes just bring the one shade)
  • powder
  • lip & cheek tint
  • concealer
  • mascara

 

In the backpack I brought:

  • sunglasses
  • camera batteries
  • extra SD card
  • lip balm
  • natural hand-sanitizer
  • phone charger
  • wallet
  • tickets/passports
  • pen & notebook
  • e-reader
  • headphones
  • camera
  • and my phone (not shown)

and for the first travel day I wore:

  • sweatershirt
  • knit trousers
  • jean jacket
  • cami
  • running shoes
  • I also ended up layering a sweater under since it surprisingly got extra cold and started snowing the day we left

 

This definitely wasn’t a perfect pack or as light as it could have been. While the temperatures were generally fine (although I’d recommend bringing layers for this time of year), there sometimes was a cold wind and also a little rain. I typically bring my light rain jacket travelling and it probably would have been useful for this trip. I also like to have camis and bodysuits for under-layers so I can wear the over-layers more than once, and I should have brought an additional one.

I didn’t end up using the purse much and could have done without. I also didn’t need the black dress – I was planning on wearing it if we went out but the other clothes I brought were dressy enough and I didn’t wear it.

For toiletries I brought both an oil cleanser and facial oil. It actually was drier in Portugal than I expected and I ended up not using the facial oil and using the cleanser also as a moisturizer. It’s the Green Balm from Magic Organic Apothecary (sent as a gift) which is a multi-purpose product that can be used as a cleanser or for skin issues like inflammation, dryness, and bug bites. I hadn’t tried it as a facial moisturizer but it worked really well in the dry climate. I was a little concerned because it’s coconut oil based which can be comedogenic but my skin had no issues with it and felt great.

Outfit with the new jacket I got in Lisbon

I was really excited to find this jacket from a sustainable brand in Lisbon. I’ve been checking thrift stores for a similar style for over a year now and just happened to find this in an eco shop, Organii, that we checked out. It’s from NäZ who uses all surplus/deadstock fabrics, even their buttons are made from recycled materials and most of the thread they use is factory leftovers! Everything is done in Portugal and they have a focus on community support and providing fair employment. They were also exhibiting at the Ethical Fashion Show last month but I unfortunately didn’t have a chance to visit them out there. I love that I not only found the style I was looking for but was also able to support a great brand and shop.

 

I’ll also be making a post about our favourite things to do, places we ate at, and eco shops in Lisbon, so keep an eye out for that!

 

Fashion Week | Sustainable & Ethical Trade Shows

Last week I went to Berlin Fashion Week to check out the Ethical Fashion Show and Green Showroom, as well as sustainable brands at the Premium and Seek fairs. I also went to Frankfurt for Innatex, another sustainable trade fair. These shows were for brands to sell their A/W 18/19 collections to stores and also included lectures and press/blogger events.

It was wonderful to see so many conscious brands, EFSB/Green Showroom had 170 labels, Premium and Seek both had green sections and Innatex had about 300 brands!

Checking out brands at the Ethical Fashion Show and Green Showroom

My goal for the week was to find some new brands and especially some that have a strong design focus. It’s no problem finding sustainable basics and I’ve shared a lot of staple brands, but it’s harder to find more fashion-forward styles. I was excited to find some brands with beautiful designs but a lot of them didn’t allow filming or photos. So here’s some of the new brands I found that I didn’t or couldn’t share in the video but will be keeping an eye on:

 

Unfortunately I wasn’t able to film the fashion show, but here’s the official video from Ethical Fashion Show Berlin:

 

Biggest takeaways that I learned/noticed at the trade shows
  • Some common trends for fall/winter are:
    • 70’s styles and prints
    • red is going strong, lots of bright and darker/faded shades
    • monochromatic looks were popular
    • corduroy has made a comeback
    • still a lot of minimalist knits
  • While brands might try some more creative designs, the basics and classics are what sell.
  • Price point is a huge struggle for brands – trying to keep prices down without compromising ethics and sustainability, and also explaining to consumers why the products cost more.
  • Organic cotton is by far the most used material (which isn’t the most sustainable).
    • Although there is material innovation happening and it’s exciting to see more recycled/upcycled materials and brands!
  • A truly vegan brand has to also have a sustainable focus, so many vegan products and materials are still harmful to animals and very damaging to the planet.
  • More conscious brands have “design first” marketing which is wonderful to see, because it doesn’t matter how eco/ethical you are if people don’t like the styles.
    • On the other hand though, a lot also need to step-up their branding, images, and information, they have great products and stories but aren’t showcasing and communicating it well online.
  • There is a lot of potential with wool, especially alpaca, which not only is an amazing fibre for clothing but can be farmed sustainably and (I believe) ethically as well.
  • Finally, this industry is built on passion, there are so many small labels who want to make a difference, tons of bloggers who use their moments of spare time to try and spread the message, and people who are trying to make changes for a better future. Even though there are always going to be things that can improve I came away feeling incredibly inspired, hopeful, and so grateful to be part of such an amazing community.

 

and speaking of bloggers…

Some of the lovely women I met creating conscious content:
English

Cherie – Sustainable Fashion Matterz

Kim – Kim Goes Eko

Lisa – At Least 

Mia – heylilahey

German

Corinna – Kissen & Karma
Franziska – Un Petit Sourire Slows Down
Jana – Not Another Woman & Gern Geschehen (podcast)
Laura – The OGNC
Lena – Healthy Lena
Marisa – My Fair Ladies
Mary and Rosi – Green Looks Great
Nicola – Fairnica
Nina – Pink & Green
Phoebe – Phoenomenal
Sarah – undeinepriseliebe
Talisa – Talisa Minoush (youtube)

 

One of the highlights was the Fashion Changers pre-peek event where you could try on clothes from the brands, and they had stylists, makeup artists, and photographers. I should have stayed longer to do some more photos, but here’s an outfit with a jumper from Lanius and pants by Maria Seifert.

Fashion Changers Pre-Peek
photo: Emilie Elizabeth

 

Overall it was a great experience and I’m so glad I went. I have a pile of business cards to go through so I can keep track of the brands I liked and need to research/hopefully will share more from. I also feel so inspired and excited about this conscious fashion movement, the change is slow, but it’s happening and will keep growing!

 

Fashion brands in the video (in order of appearance):

(note that the pieces shown in the video are for FW 18/19 though so likely aren’t currently available)

 

Check out the interviews from last year’s event.

 

* indicates an affiliate link, for more information please see disclosure policy

10 Ways to Change your Shopping Habits

Changing your shopping habits can be really difficult. We often shop for fun, as a reward, to de-stress, or to spend time with friends or family but bad shopping habits typically result in impulse purchases, unworn clothes, a cluttered closet, and spending time and money on things you don’t love.

Here’s 10 tips to stop shopping or change the way you shop:
  1. Remember why you want to change your shopping habits
  2. Replace shopping with other activities (here’s some ideas)
  3. Separate needs vs wants
  4. Take time to think about an item before buying it
  5. Try a shopping challenge – no shopping, secondhand only, no fast fashion, etc. for 3 months, 6 months, or even a year!
  6. Use the “one in one out” rule to shop less
  7. Unsubscribe from newsletters and unfollow brands who share lots of sales and promotions
  8. Have a strict budget
  9. Use a shopping list and stick to it
  10. Take the money you would have spent and put it in savings for your dream vacation, an investment garment, or anything you really want to save for

 

Any other tips?

 

Easy Colourful Eyeshadow

found in makeup | 1

I try to keep my makeup collection minimal but versatile. My makeup look is generally simple but I also like to be able to do more creative looks occasionally without buying new products.

Colorful eyeshadow

 

The colours in my versatile eyeshadow palette are:

  • brown (also used for brows and contour)
  • black or grey (which can also be used wet as an eyeliner)
  • white (also used as a highlight)
  • red or pink (which I mainly used as blush)
  • and then a “fun” colour – I currently have this copper shimmer shade

This eyeshadow look only used 3 shadows (plus the brown for brows). I started with black in the outer corner and into the crease in a triangle shape, it’s a blueish-black so looks purpley when layered with the red. The red shadow is then put into the center of the triangle, on the outer-half of the eyelid, and blended with the black. Next I put the copper shadow on the inner-half of the eyelid and a little into the crease. On the lower lid I used the red again on the outer corner and copper in the middle.

Easy colourful eyeshadow

What do you think of this makeup look?

 

My eyeshadows are from Red Apple Lipstick* (black – black magic and I also have brownie points for shadow/brows, and buttercream for shadow/highlight), PuroBio* (red – Marsala), and Couleur Caramel (copper – I believe this shade is no longer available though).

 

 

*indicates an affiliate link, for more information please see the disclosure policy for more info.

Winter 2018 Capsule Wardrobe

please note: this post contains some affiliate links

 

The pieces I chose for my winter capsule wardrobe:

  1. Velvet bodysuit from Underprotection (read a brand review)
  2. Navy tee from Lanius
  3. Blue spot tee from Dedicated*
  4. Black tee from Funktion Schnitt 
  5. Black sweatshirt from Dedicated*
  6. Grey jumper from People Tree
  7. Grey top from Comazo | earth
  8. Long shirt from ArmedAngels
  9. Plaid draped shirt – secondhand
  10. Beige cardigan – old
  11. Green cardigan – DIY/handmade
  12. Gold/green jacket – secondhand
  13. Grey/brown sweater from Izzy Lane
  14. Blue fisherman sweater – secondhand/vintage
  15. Sweater from People Tree
  16. Red jumper – old
  17. Black pants from People Tree
  18. Wool trousers – secondhand
  19. Light jeans from MUD Jeans*
  20. Linen skirt from NotPerfectLinen* (read more about my love of linen)
  21. Black dress from People Tree
  22. Check tunic from People Tree
  23. Tee dress from Kowtow
  24. Ikat jumpsuit from Matter Prints* (more about ikat and the jumpsuit)
  25. Brown jacket – DIY/handmade
  26. Denim jacket – secondhand
  27. Woven cape – secondhand/vintage
  28. Knit vest – DIY/handmade
  29. Purple/teal scarf – DIY/handmade
  30. Knit brown/red scarf – DIY/handmade
  31. Cream knit hat – DIY/handmade
  32. Black floppy hat – secondhand
  33. Backpack from Matt & Nat (please read why I no longer support Matt & Nat)
  34. Black purse from Matt & Nat (please read why I no longer support Matt & Nat)

 

My capsule wardrobe is adapted from the Project 333 challenge. Over the course of creating my many capsule wardrobes I’ve been fine-tuning them to figure out what works best for me. In the spring I decided to no longer include shoes as part of my capsule wardrobe, because I feel I have a good core “shoe capsule” and the one thing I often seemed to miss was some pair of shoes that I hadn’t included.

I also find that I need more pieces in the fall and winter and fewer in the spring and summer, so I don’t try to hit a specific number, I just build a wardrobe I think would work well, and it usually ends up being 30-35 pieces.

 

 

* this item was sent as a gift from the brand

Green Favourites 2017

Every month I make a video highlighting 5 things– a green product, a slow fashion brand,  a book or doc, something new I’ve learned, and a blogger or youtuber I follow. Here are the things featured in 2017.

 

Green Products

Soap/wash nuts for laundry
DIY cotton makeup pads
Coconut oil
Stainless steel straws
Menstrual cup
DoneGood (free app/extension)
BunchaFarmers natural stain remover
Bamboo toothbrush
Toothpaste tablets
Vinegar for cleaning
Guppyfriend Bag

 

Slow Fashion

Sleeping Gypsy
Love Justly *
Offset Warehouse (fabric & sewing supplies)
Zero Waste Daniel
Deadwood
Neo Thread Co.
Christy Dawn
Jungle Folk
Folk Fibers (naturally dyed quilts)
Myssyfarmi
Hoodlamb

 

Books

Slow Fashion by Safia Minney
Women in Clothes
Soulful Simplicity by Courtney Carver

 

Docs/Movies

Plastic China
Chasing Ice
Planet Money Makes a T-Shirt
Okja (fiction, on Netflix)
A wage you can live on – Textile Workers in Cambodia

 

Podcasts

Sustainababble 
Wardrobe Crisis

 

Blogs

The Note Passer
Moral Fibres
Life + Style + Justice
Ethical Unicorn
Dominique Drakeford & MelaninASS

 

Youtube Channels

The Girl Gone Green
Sweet Potato Soul
Kristen Leo
Exploring Alternatives
Use Less

 

*indicates an affiliate link, by purchasing through this link you are helping support My Green Closet! For more information on my use of affiliate links please see the disclosure policy.

30 Sustainable Resolutions for 2018

Go green in 2018! Living sustainably is all about making small changes and continuing to learn and improve. Incorporate some sustainable goals into your new year’s resolutions for a more conscious 2018.

 

Eco friendly resolution ideas:

1. Air dry your clothes to help them last longer and save energy and money

2. Watch/read an environmental documentary or book every month (check out resources for some recommendations)

3. Avoid palm oil (more about palm oil and deforestation)

4. Never throw away clothes (what to do with your old clothes)

5. Start a capsule wardrobe (how I plan my capsule wardrobe)

6. Switch to reusable menstrual products (more about switching to a menstrual cup)

7. Try to first repair items before throwing them away

8. Drive less- instead walk, bike, take public transit, car pool, etc.

9. Wash your clothes in cold water (more clothing care tips)

10. Use natural and non-toxic cleaning products in your home (my simple, DIY cleaning products)

Simple, green cleaning products - vinegar, baking soda, and Dr. Bronner's liquid soap

11. Host a clothing swap so your friends, family, or community can shop each other’s closets

12. Try a shopping fast/challenge

13. Switch to a green energy supplier for your home

14. Buy only cruelty-free beauty products

15. Contact your favourite brands and ask questions

16. Buy products in bulk

17. Reduce meat and animal products from your diet, even just eating a more Mediterranean diet makes a big difference

18. Find green beauty alternatives (more about the products I use)

19. Incorporate seasonal foods into your meals

20. Buy organic

21. Always bring a reusable mug/bottle

22. Contact your government reps about important issues

23. Plan your shopping and reduce food waste

blueberries

24. Set up a monthly donation to your favourite organization

25. Buy from local businesses first

26. Carbon offset all your travel (how to carbon offset)

27. Volunteer for an organization/important cause

28. Avoid synthetics or get a Guppyfriend bag to help reduce microfibre pollution

guppyfriend laundry bag - reduce microfibre pollution

29. Take part in a sustainable community – like the My Green Closet Facebook group 😉

30. Share your favourite conscious fashion finds on social media

 

 

What are your sustainable resolutions for the new year?

 

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